The Shrieking Pits

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Tucked away in the north Norfolk coastal hinterland, close to the villages of Overstrand and Northrepps, is a group of small ponds known as the Shrieking Pits. More of the same can also be found a few miles further west near Aylmerton close to Felbrigg Hall. Thought to be early medieval excavations for iron ore, the resultant pits have long been filled with water and softened by vegetation to allow them to blend in with the scenery as if they were natural features in this gentle post-glacial landscape.

Seeking them out, we made our way on foot from Overstrand, following the Paston Way inland through dark woodland and prairie-sized fields of barley and oilseed rape. The pits lie amidst arable land just beyond a farm at Hungry Hill, a name that points towards agricultural impoverishment at some time in the past. The pits stand beside a green lane, a byway of some antiquity that may have been here as long as the excavations themselves.

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The first one we come across is small, surrounded by willows of a uniform height. In the ring of tree shade that encloses the shallow pond, a wooden palette left over from some undefined farming business lies next to the water liked an abandoned raft. The main ‘pit’ is nearby, an altogether larger and more impressive pond edged in by semi-recumbent oaks. The water is glassy and ink-black, suggesting great depth and perhaps a little menace. On the far bank the surface is coated with pond weed the colour of puréed peas. A small wooden notice board has been placed next to one of the oaks is but it is bare, its writing long gone to leave it devoid of information other than that which can be told by wood grain alone. Despite this unwitting redaction, a tangible sense of genius loci suggests that there is something to be told of this place other than a chance meeting of trees and water.

Naturally with a name like Shrieking Pit there is a strong likelihood of dark legend. The mundane answer is that the name alludes to the sound emitted by the exposed gravels. But does gravel really shriek? It scrapes and it crunches but does it make a noise quite so dreadful? Shriek is a loaded word, a term that evokes emotion – fear, dismay, even terror. It is these qualities that inform the folklore associated with the place.

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The story goes that a grieving young woman haunts the locality. It tells of a heartbroken 17 year-old called Esmeralda who was seduced and then abandoned by a duplicitous local farmer. Inconsolable, the desperate young woman is said to have thrown herself into the water of the pit one dark night before immediately regretting her decision and crying for help that did not come. Her unheard cries are said to be heard at the spot each February 24th, the anniversary of her death.

Another story tells of a horse and cart vanishing without trace in the pool’s murky depths. Looking at the black unreflecting water it seems perfectly possible. Places such as this, although mere dust specks on the map, are the bread and butter of rural folklore. Such places inevitably become repositories of legend – features where the landscape can be painted with tales of intrigue, romance and horror. As the notice board is currently blank perhaps we should feel free to write our own story.

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References:

http://www.heritage.norfolk.gov.uk/record-details?MNF6787-Shrieking-Pits

https://www.hiddenea.com/norfolkn.htm#northrepps

About East of Elveden

Hidden places, secret histories and unsung geography from the east of England and beyond
This entry was posted in Folklore, Norfolk and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to The Shrieking Pits

  1. Tom Phelan says:

    With place names such as Felbrigg Hall, Hungry Hill and Shrieking Pits, together with your own descriptions of “glassy and ink-black” water with its “murky depths” I could feel the ghost stories coming before you spoke them! The writing was so good I was there with you. Wouldn’t want to be there on my own at night though!

  2. Andrew says:

    Fascinating, thanks, I live in North Norfolk and didn’t know about this interesting place.

  3. Paul says:

    I have a photo of the old notice from the board, dated from a walk in 2007, that I have included a download link for.
    I hope it works, feel free to include the link/photo in the post if you wish.
    https://mega.nz/file/l9gUWSDb#fk7nCOAWkzeFqnx-IWd9uoS7NB8_ENkx5csf1eH0eS0
    I can email the photo if that would be easier.
    It was a lovely summer day when I passed by and I wasn’t spooked but I can imagine given the right conditions on the day it can be a desolate and foreboding place.

  4. Clare Pooley says:

    What an atmospheric place! Thanks for the history of the Shrieking Pits, Laurence.

  5. I love the idea of the notice board blank for more stories to be told. Lovely post.

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