Tag Archives: psychogeography

Space is the Place – Shakespeare and Sun Ra

Still reeling from the solar onslaught of the Sun Ra Arkestra the previous night we travelled yesterday to Great Yarmouth to see The Tempest at the town’s Hippodrome Theatre. The Sun Ra Arkestra fronted by nonagenarian alto-sax maestro Marshall Allen … Continue reading

Posted in Literature, music, Norfolk, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Birmingham Edgelands Part 2

Edgelands are not necessarily always on the urban edge. Not physically anyway – the important thing is they are perceived as different from the zones that lay beyond. Neither strictly urban nor rural but an overlooked amalgam of the two … Continue reading

Posted in History, Human Geography, Midlands | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Birmingham Edgelands Part 1

Some cities draw you straight in from their edges by dint of gravity or beckoning pathways – officially designated walking routes or desire roads shaped by regular footfall. Not so Birmingham: here the momentum at the city’s outer limits is … Continue reading

Posted in Cities, Human Geography, Midlands | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

At Covehithe

The day before the autumn equinox: the setting, the beach at Covehithe. We have gathered here at the north Suffolk coast to walk and talk. A literary walk to celebrate W. G. Sebald’s The Rings of Saturn, no less, organised … Continue reading

Posted in History, Literature, Suffolk, Walking | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Edgeland

Edgelands are everywhere, orbiting our towns and cities like unbeautiful rings of Saturn: non-places, junkspace, transitory transition zones that lie between that which is unequivocally urban or rural. Transitory because they are spaces in flux, with fluid geography that today … Continue reading

Posted in History, Human Geography, Norfolk | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Pleasure of Ruins

Abandoned Soviet-era hotel, Kazbegi, Georgia “You don’t know why ruins give so much pleasure. I will tell you. . . Everything dissolves, everything perishes, everything passes, only time goes on. . . How old the world is. I walk between … Continue reading

Posted in Caucasus, Russia, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Botanising the asphalt

The German philosopher and literary critic Walter Benjamin referred to the unwitting psychogeographical practices of the urban flâneur as that of ‘botanising the asphalt’: a way of experiencing the city as a repository of collective memory by means of a … Continue reading

Posted in Human Geography, wildlife | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

Orford Ness

Walking, whether rambling or hiking in the countryside, or the unplanned urban exploration of a would-be flâneur’s dérive – call it what you will – seems to be the hippest new literary genre. Often found cosily in tandem with what can only be described … Continue reading

Posted in Literature, Suffolk, Walking | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

North-South divide?

Back in 2007, Danny Dorling of the University of Sheffield wrote a piece on the nature and geographical extent of the so-called North-South divide in Britain. This was nothing new: as most of us already knew, the north-south socio-economic divide was not simply … Continue reading

Posted in Human Geography | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Patience (After Sebald) – Walking The Rings of Saturn

About a year ago I wrote a post about an Aldeburgh Music weekend at Suffolk’s Snape Maltings that celebrated the life and works of the writer W G Sebald. A new film by Grant Gee, Patience (After Sebald), was also previewed on that … Continue reading

Posted in film, Literature, Walking | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments