Skellig Michael – The Edge of the World

IMG_4023Today is St Patrick’s Day and March 17 is the supposed date of the 5th-century missionary’s death. Patrick was the forerunner of many early missionaries who came to Irish shores to preach Christianity, the island more receptive to new ideas about religion than its larger neighbour to the east across the Irish Sea. Consequently Ireland abounds with relics and ruins of early Christianity, sometimes in the most improbable of places.IMG_3921.JPGSailing around Ireland’s southwest coast, skirting the peninsulas that splay out from the Kerry coast, the two islands of the Skelligs come into view after rounding Bolus Head at the end of the Inveragh Peninsula. Both islands are sheer, with sharp-finned summits that resemble inverted boat keels. The smaller of the two appears largely white at first but increasing proximity reveals that the albino effect is down to a combination of nesting gannets and guano.  The acrid tang of ammonia on the breeze and distant cacophony announce the presence of the birds well before the identity of any individual can be confirmed by binoculars.IMG_3925As the boat draws closer, the sheer volume of birds – gannets, fulmars, puffins, terns – becomes plain to see. With something like 70,000 birds, Little Skellig is the second largest gannet colony in the world. But on the larger island of Skellig Michael, although seabirds abound here too, there is also the suggestion of a human presence, albeit an historic one. High up in the rocks, small stone structures can be discerned: rounded domes that are clearly man-made and which soften the jagged silhouette of the island’s summit.  These are beehive cells, the dry-stone oratories favoured by early Irish monks for their meditation. Sitting aloft the island on a high terrace, commanding a panoramic view over the Atlantic Ocean in one direction and the fractal Kerry coast in the other, these simple stone cells came without windows – the business was one of prayer and meditation not horizon-gazing. Such isolation was necessary for reasons of both safety and spirituality. And Skellig Michael was the acme of isolation. In the early Christian milieu the Skellig Islands, facing the seemingly limitless Atlantic off the southwest coast of Ireland, were more than merely remote: they were at the very edge of the known world.IMG_3960The island’s monastic site is infused with mystery, as all good ruins are, but is thought to have been established in the 6th century by Saint Fionán. Consisting of six beehive cells, two oratories and a later medieval church, the site occupies a stone terrace 600 feet above the swirling green waters of the sea below.IMG_4001Skirting Skellig Michael, a landing stage with a helicopter pad comes into view. A vertiginous path of stone steps leads up towards the beehive huts close to the island’s mountain-like summit.  We do not disembark. Instead we keep sailing, bound for a safer harbour in Glengarriff in County Cork. No matter, the sight of the rocks, the winding, climbing path and the austere cells on the terrace at the top is already imprinted on our memory.IMG_3989Without doubt this was a life of supreme hardship: the isolation, the relentless diet of fish and seabird eggs, the ever-battering wind and salt-spray. Such was the isolation, and so extreme the privations of this beatific pursuit, that one might assume that the monks would have been left in peace to practice their calling. This was not to be. Viking raiders arrived here in the early 9th century and took the trouble to land, scale the island’s heights and attack the monks. For most of us it is probably difficult to comprehend the blind-rage fury of the raiders, the wrath invoked in them by pious upstarts with their new Christian God. Easier perhaps is to imagine the dread that must have been felt by the monks as the Vikings approached their spiritual eyrie.IMG_4041

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About East of Elveden

Hidden places, secret histories and unsung geography from the east of England and beyond
This entry was posted in History, Islands, Travel, wildlife and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Skellig Michael – The Edge of the World

  1. blosslyn says:

    How wonderful to get that close, beautiful photos 🙂

  2. Your gorgious pictures and intersting reportage about the early monks and their hardship are bringing back my memories of the Ring of Kerry! Thanks and best regards

  3. Pingback: Weekend Reading | Common Sense and Whiskey

  4. Always interesting and astonishing to read about the lives of these early Christian monks. What a trip to see it for yourself!

  5. I was away when this came out so a beautiful late reward in April for me! Wonderful, rich words and astonishing images, Laurence. So evocative of those places that exist along edges: remote, reflective, and bridging both earth and sea. A joy to read about this morning – many thanks.

    • Many thanks for such kind and generous words Julian. I have followed your recent Assam journey with much interest and not a little nostalgia. These sort of places stay in the mind long after we have left them. This is, of course, equally true for Skellig Michael even if my time there was painfully brief.

  6. It always seems to me that Ireland has a very rough kind of beauty to it. Haven’t visited yet, but any day now.

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